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ID: 12301
180

Lamellar armor in Early Middle Ages was not so popular as chainmail however some archaeological findings (Birka, Gotland, Sweden) give a proof that this kind of armor was used in Scandinavic region. According to historical sources viking armor had some influence from Byzantine Empire and Kyivan Rus since some vikings were mercenaries in both. In

ID: 13504
123

Splinted arms protection, 14 century. Made of 1.5mm cold rolled steel (base option) and durable brown leather thicknesses 4mm. Also available in 1.0mm and 1.5mm spring (tempered) steel. For high protection properties of leather it had been impregnated by the special wax solution and it can hold the axe hit. Leather has natural flexibility. Additionally the reinforcing

ID: 13205
288

Brigandine arms consists of biceps, articulated elbows, vambraces (brassards). Brigandine arms additionally reinforced with steel plates. Perfectly articulated elbows are joint with arms by rivets – no holes, no leather laces. Upper arms have leather points that provides proper fixation on your gambeson. Brigandine arms are equipped with leather straps and steel buckles. Brigandine armor

ID: 13204
112

Brigandine arms completed with steel elbow cops. Plates are made of 1.5mm cold rolled steel. The inner tissue is tarpaulin, outer fabric is 100% natural wool. Brigandine arms are also available in 1.0mm and 1.5mm tempered (hardened) steel. Special construction provides great mobility. Brigandine arms are very simply taking apart which makes it’s transportation and

ID: 13603
234

Gauntlets without separate fingers were developed at early XV century. The idea was to create good protection of the palm where four fingers will be covered by one large steel plate. Such armor was called Mitten Gauntlets or Hentzen (Germany), mitons (French), mittene (Italian). They were commonly used both at the battle fields and during

ID: 13507
230

A “tulip” shaped brassards were popular in XIV and beginning of XV century: narrow at wrist they go wider to the elbow.The main examples of such arms armor can be found in Churburg Castle (Castel Coira) in South Tirol. Another one – arms of Charles VI when he had a status of Dauphin de France,

ID: 13501
115

Made of tempered steel with thickness 1.0 mm. Basic steel arms set protects you by covering your arms from the top of shoulder till armlet. This armor has good movement properties which provides you excellent mobility. You can easy take apart it for transporting. Armour is equipped with leather straps with steel buckles and leather

ID: 13502
128

This complect of full hand protection is made of 1,5 mm thick cold rolled steel. It provides protection of hand from wrist to shoulder. With the help of leather belts and steel buckles it is very comfortable to wear with other parts of armour. It can protect you from impacts of different kinds of weapons,

ID: 13505
368

Pair of articulated arms, Milan, 1385. Picture taken from the Churburg castle, South Tyrol region. We offer you reconstruction of this armor. We use cold rolled steel, thickness is 1.5 mm. Please notice, that measurements should be with padding/gambeson.

ID: 13506
930

Late XV century full plate arm protection. It consists of: pauldrons, rerebraces, elbow cops and vambraces. In the first quarter of XV century Milanese armorers invented very simple way to connect all parts of arm protection by the help of leather straps or sliding rivets. This invention made arm fully covered with no gap between

ID: 12105
234

Approximately since 1360 year lentner armor got need to be much reinforced by steel plates. This basic armor consisted of steel plates which were riveted or sewn to the base material. Lenter gave the beginning to well-known brigandine armor. Plates that protect breast and back became bigger. Often breast area was covered by two large

ID: 12102
184

Usually, brigantine was made of small plates. However, small plates were kept impact badly, and since the small-plate brigantine supplanted usual, the plates were again enlarged, making the former bigger, but better fitting to body. A characteristic feature of a big-plate brigantine, in addition to large plates, was a skirt of laminar structures, that was